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Author Topic: 1977 Peavey Classic 212 Series 100  (Read 9914 times)

creekster52

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1977 Peavey Classic 212 Series 100
« on: September 10, 2013, 09:28:28 PM »
I picked this up a couple of weeks ago off craigslist. This is the first twin combo I've had in many years, and I love the fullness of the sound.

This amp is a hybrid with a SS preamp & tube power section (2 ea. - 6L6GC) with 50W output. It has a bright channel, normal channel, Parallel & Series. Also reverb and tremolo. All controllable by footswitch. 3-band EQ and a master volume, bright volume & normal volume. The speakers are 12" Eminence with square magnets.

I did have to buy a footswitch, and I had the amp serviced because I was just positive the caps would be bad, but they weren't. Turned out to be just very dirty pots, and had to add a new fuse holder.

This is possibly one of the most versatile amps I have ever owned.

Amp: $165.00
Custom footswitch: $105
Service: $100



 


« Last Edit: September 10, 2013, 10:58:09 PM by creekster52 »

reb

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Re: 1977 Peavey Classic 212 Series 100
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2013, 04:12:50 PM »
i got to play through one of those at a luthier's shop. sounded pretty good! congratulations!

zagatron1

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Re: 1977 Peavey Classic 212 Series 100
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2013, 06:02:12 PM »
How's your back since you picked it up Creek? ::) I HAD one of those, plus a Peavey Deuce (4 x 6L6s) and a Renoun (not all at the same time :o ) and in addition to being bullet proof, they weighed a ton each. All were 2 x 12 and only the Renoun was 100% solid state and had Black Widow speakers. All good amps tho'.

robert

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Re: 1977 Peavey Classic 212 Series 100
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2013, 02:03:48 AM »
I had a Peavey Special and a Peavey Deuce - I think they both were pretty bad. Very one-dimensional and I'm glad I don't have them anymore... Sorry but I just think new designs and ideas during the last 10 years have produced so much better sounding amps than what the 70s and 80s did, at least when it comes to solid state or solid state hybrids.

Love live real tube amps. Especially vintage ones.  ;)

creekster52

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Re: 1977 Peavey Classic 212 Series 100
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2013, 08:48:58 PM »
It is fairly heavy Zag, but not much heavier than my Triumph 60, which has the single 12" Scorpion speaker with a huge magnet.

I had a Peavey Special and a Peavey Deuce - I think they both were pretty bad.

Peavey hybrids seem to have worked pretty well for these guys...

Allen Collins
Neal Schon
Jeff Carlisi
Gary Rossington
 ;D
« Last Edit: September 13, 2013, 10:15:03 AM by creekster52 »

robert

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Re: 1977 Peavey Classic 212 Series 100
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2013, 02:15:54 PM »
Oh I just meant I didn't like them so much - they sure sound just fine in a band setting. Tone is such a personal thing, and there is no right or wrong - whatever floats one's boat is all that matters! Cheers!

creekster52

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Re: 1977 Peavey Classic 212 Series 100
« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2013, 08:57:56 PM »
I understand completely. One of the reasons I like the Peavey amps is because the older ones are built like a tank, and they were built in the southern U.S.  Peavey Customer Service is unparalleled in my opinion. They even cruise the Peavey forum, and occasionally offer advice. There are a few retired employees on the forum that really know the older products too. They are the only manufacturer that I know of where you can actually download an owner's manual for a 36 year old amp straight off their website.

Case in point: I recently took my 1997 Gibson "The Hawk" to my usual guitar shop to have a Kahler trem installed, which required plugging the holes from the original bridge studs, and refinishing the installation area. They were experiencing out-gassing on the touchup, which resulted in small bubbles in the finish. My guitar tech is very experienced, but has never experienced a problem like this guitar.

I emailed Gibson to request information on the finishes used. Their response was nitrocellulose laquer (duh!), like we didn't already know that! I responded inquiring if it could be a reaction to the primer/filler used, and never received a response.

Result? This will probably be the last Gibson guitar I will ever buy.

 
« Last Edit: September 13, 2013, 10:19:20 PM by creekster52 »