Want to learn jazz?

Have you seen my latest Blues Course - Slow 60 Blues?

Author Topic: Guitar for slide  (Read 7481 times)

Scratch N Sniff

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 91
    • View Profile
Guitar for slide
« on: January 08, 2011, 05:05:58 PM »
I am a new comer to slide, but I'm at it like a dog with two. Now I need a guitar to raise the action on ! Beat up and refurbish or new ? I can get a Epiphone Korina V for 290, good neck and pick ups if they don't suit can be changed. Don't like Strats ! 
« Last Edit: January 08, 2011, 05:08:16 PM by Scratch N Sniff »

DetroitBlues

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1804
    • View Profile
Re: Guitar for slide
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2011, 10:47:25 PM »
Better off buying a guitar that is used.  If you give up on playing slide or decide you want move on to something else, you can sell it for what you paid.  As for setting up a guitar for slide, I suggest getting a nut shelf (not sure what they call it), it fits on top of the nut, effectively raising it up a few MM.  Flatter radiuses are better, such as the Epiphone you like.  It helps to keep the slide flat without worrying about setup.  I've seen more slide players on SG's and Tele's, than Les Pauls and Strats.  Never did see a V player, but then again, how many V players before Albert King played one for blues?

diaper head

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 531
    • View Profile

creekster52

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 675
    • View Profile
Re: Guitar for slide
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2011, 12:18:33 AM »
Don't forget about the Danelectro 56-U2 (aluminum nut).

Bluefingers

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 46
    • View Profile
Re: Guitar for slide
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2011, 06:13:46 PM »
Two (and more) schools
 - A regular setting guitar for to play with both fingers and slide
In this case, your strings follow your neck radius
Some slides are "radiused"
http://www.jimdunlop.com/product/harris-slide
That solution is very convenient because you can slide the six strings at the same time (open tuning),
This slide type is loud on your 3 or 4 finger but the louder better the sound and sustain
Works great with your radiused neck and without removing height strings
You can also play with a regular bottleneck but you have to angle this one to respect the radius
Forgive the octaves 1 and 6 strings (for extreme example)

 - You raise your strings at the same height
Use a regulal cylindrical bottleneck
I own some regular market models, but I love make my own (Copper, steel, glass...)
Perfect for slide, but harder for your fingers on the fretboard if you want to play both
Easy to do with Fender's like bridges
With Gibson's like, you'll always be radiused
You don't like Fender, I don't insist...

Agree with Creekster 52 Jimi Page slided on danelectro
We saw him on live videos
Who could say what guitar he played?
 - 1969 BBC sessions
   - Travelling Riverside Blues (Danelectro 12?)
   - What is and what should never be
   - You shook me
I bet on Les Paul with regular setting...
 - Led Zeppelin 1971
   - When the levee breaks (Dano 12?, SG double neck?)

Jimi Hendrix was known to make slide effect on his mic stand during lives
Who knows what kind of setting/tuning/slide he used on Bob Dylan's cover All along the watchtower (Electric Ladyland) from 02:00 to 2.15?

Go to Gibson official site and look at Arlen Roth's slide lessons
He plays awsome and says that his guitars are in regular setting with a cylindrical steel slide...

Your question is a very good (sorry, I'm not sure to understand it...)
Some personnal answers
You own only one guitar to play slide Let it on regular setting with strong strings to avoid unwanted fret noises
I you own two, dedicate one to slide setting
If you own several guitars, dedicate everyone to a special use
I usually work every pieces together And I hate tune my guitar for a special gift

In my case
Strat custom with vintage tremolo - Regular setting - regular tuning
Strat MIJ - Vintage tremolo blocked and regular setting - all tunings
Les Paul - Regular setting - all tunings
Aria Pro II CS 350 - Slide setting (strings raised)
Dano 12 Regular tuning!!!
Acoustic Suzuki 1980 - regular setting but dedicated to several tunings
Other really cheap acoustic guitars (30) Enough to practice and occasionnaly to offer to some music interrested little boys/future musicians...
Each one has his own tuning G - A - D - E and others
This way, if I want to work a special tuning piece, I just change guitar It's very convenient and for the price...
one last thing, for dedicated slide guitar, don't remember Dobro and lap steel and further pedal steel...
http://www.jimdunlop.com/product/lap-dawg-tonebar
http://www.jimdunlop.com/product/tonebars

I hope you'll understand my frenchy english better than me
Anyway, go on with your slide
It has a wondeful sound
Like ever, DetroitBlues  is right
Wow, I'm talkative this night...
Friendly

DetroitBlues

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1804
    • View Profile
Re: Guitar for slide
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2011, 01:58:51 PM »
Yep, there really isn't any right or wrong way to set up.  The only thing is many people use open tuning and keep the action high enough where you don't touch the frets while playing the slide...

Scratch N Sniff

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 91
    • View Profile
Re: Guitar for slide
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2011, 05:55:06 PM »
Thanks for the reply guys. I think I'll go for the V, it's cheap and plays pretty good as it is. I've taken onboard the advice and will keep you posted as to how I get on.

DetroitBlues

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1804
    • View Profile
Re: Guitar for slide
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2011, 03:23:44 PM »
When you're ready to share, post some pics or vids of you playing!