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Author Topic: C maj scale  (Read 28375 times)

weelie

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Re: C maj scale
« Reply #15 on: October 30, 2010, 02:52:51 PM »
I think the most useful thing is leaning the open position C major scale and play simple melodies you know with it. That's happy birthday, twinkle twinkle, mary had a little lamb, saint's go marchin etc.

Another thing I found VERY useful, related to major scale is Understanding guitar chords, by Bob Balsley. Very simple books, explains what the open position chords are made of. NEVER needed a chord book since I read that book.

Also, similarly to CAGED, in a way... I learned the CGDAE major scales in the open position. Yes, in the order CGDAE, as for the next one you always just move one note one fret up to play the next scale. (It's the b7 to maj7 note)

Of course it's useful to understand the making of a major scale in chords. So in C:
Cmaj7, Dm7, Em7, Fmaj7, G7, Am7, Bdim.
...as a lot of songs use these chords, and if the song is strictly in C major, that's all the chords you have.
 

Rick04901

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Re: C maj scale
« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2010, 09:08:47 PM »
hope i don't get banned for spamming but this site has all chords and scales and the extensions

http://www.chordbook.com/      up top click guitar scales
[/quote

Well, not exactly all]scales - there are a whole bunch more. Check out the net for scale modes. There are seven of them (the 1st one is the major scale aka Ionian) Interesting and sometimes baffling stuff!

sven

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Re: C maj scale
« Reply #17 on: November 04, 2010, 09:18:57 PM »
If you can sing the do re mi song thats the major scale.  Thats in most everyones head and you'll be able to tell quickly if you're playing it wrong if you have that song in your head.  Since you're in Japan hopefully you'll still remember it.

hillbilly joe old

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Re: C maj scale
« Reply #18 on: November 17, 2010, 08:27:14 PM »
If you can sing the do re mi song thats the major scale.  Thats in most everyones head and you'll be able to tell quickly if you're playing it wrong if you have that song in your head.  Since you're in Japan hopefully you'll still remember it.
;D

DetroitBlues

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Re: C maj scale
« Reply #19 on: November 19, 2010, 09:38:36 AM »
Theroy is the hardest thing to learn, I barely know any of it.  But I've come to realize, I really need to learn it because I won't grow as a guitarist unless I learn it...

zagatron1

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Re: C maj scale
« Reply #20 on: November 19, 2010, 02:38:16 PM »
I don't know any of that stuff. I just do, or should I say... play things I can't even explain. ::)

DetroitBlues

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Re: C maj scale
« Reply #21 on: November 19, 2010, 03:23:04 PM »
I'm in the same boat, I play stuff that just makes sense to my ear and make some kind of theory...

robert

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Re: C maj scale
« Reply #22 on: November 19, 2010, 11:03:24 PM »
One more thing, having read Bluefingers and what he says is right but it may be simpler to learn the major scale at the 5th fret (A) and slide the scale up and down the neck. i.e A major  at the 5th, slide the same scale to the 8 fret and its C major or down to the 1st fret and its F major.

The formula for the major scale is Tone -  Tone -  Semitone  -  Tone  -  Tone   -   Tone   -   Semitone
                                               
                                                       T      T     S     T     T      T      S
                                                   C  -  D  -  E  -  F  -  G  -  A  -  B  -  C

Just to confuse you more. :) I use the names Wholestep and Halfstep - but it's the exact same meaning. Learn this formula inside out. Then you automatically know 12 keys of the major scale - just start on a new fret (note) and follow the formula. Hope that makes sense.

The formula for the major scale is Wholestep -  Wholestep -  Halfstep  -  Wholestep  -  Wholestep   -   Wholestep   -   Halfstep
                                               
                                                       W    W     H     W    W     W      H
                                                   C  -  D  -  E  -  F  -  G  -  A  -  B  -  C

sven

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Re: C maj scale
« Reply #23 on: November 20, 2010, 12:50:05 PM »
I don't know any of that stuff. I just do, or should I say... play things I can't even explain. ::)

Many of the best players just do it by ear.  I think (based on all the theory I know and can't use) that playing by ear is superior.  After I learned all my scales I still had (have) to learn how to make em sound like music.  But on the flip side, I don't think I could have learned by ear.  I don't know how anyone can.

GreyBee

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Re: C maj scale
« Reply #24 on: November 20, 2010, 03:13:56 PM »
Here is my theory on music theory.  Making beautiful music requires both playing by ear and music theory.  I would contend that those successful players who claim to only play by ear, actually know and apply music theory – just not in a verbal way.  Different people learn in different ways.  The most important factor is actually the amount of time spent in productive practice.  (If you have read the book “Outliers” by Malcolm Gladwell you would know that the requirement is 10,000 hours).  It needs to be fun and rewarding, otherwise you won’t invest the time necessary.   ;)

Beth

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Re: C maj scale
« Reply #25 on: March 07, 2011, 02:10:46 AM »
Scales are a guide to be familiar with the notes.  Best theory I got when I came back to guitar after 17 years of not touching one was at the Grey Fox Bluegrass Festival at the Slow Jam the guitar guy showed a chart emphasizing the 1, 4 and 5 of the scale as most important notes
1                               4         5         6m
I         ii          iii         IV        V        vi        vii  dim
C        D          E         F         G        Am        B                    key of C major

G       A           B          C         D        E          F#                 key of G major   etc.

So most played chords in any major key are the I, IV, and V.    The vi or minor 6 is the next most important and any other of the notes would be minor except for the 7th note which is diminished. Knowing this helps you to jam along at bluegrass jams when you don't know the songs...mostly simple songs....and this helped me start to write my on songs...I took off with it.  Another good thing to know is the key of C major and the key of A minor are related in that they share the same notes and same chords. I have a mandolin chord book that groups all the chords by key putting the major key with it's minor 6th.

Using this numbering system above is how you transpose to another key. Write out the other key and assign the number to it....see above....Well you have to look at the circle of fifths to know how the sharps and flats are added and I keep a copy of that on my wall.

Years ago I took guitar lessons and the first teacher made me read music so I learned to read notes but then I fired him and got another teacher to teach me to play by ear. But that first year helped me really understand timing and helped me read tab.  Some theory is very useful...to know what you are playing

Other good things to know is the notes on the fat E string and notes on Fat A string so you know what key you are in for 5th root and 6th root scales...also to know what bar chord you are playing.

Another easy tip is to understand the octaves...so at the 5th fret bass string is A, skip one string and 2 frets down is an octave and that is also an A so it helps you to know what those notes are...helps when you want to resolve to the root note when playing in box 1 as well as there are some root 4 bar chords as well.

I think it's important to have fun with guitar and not be burdened with too much theory.  Many have quit because of Berklee style teachers making them read every note on the guitar neck which is laborious...but as you can see it's helpful to know many of those notes.  Everyone has to find what works for them.  I find if I am playing from tablature I end up analyzing it to see what scales I am playing out of and why does this or that work.  Some theory is very useful especially the theory that relates to the guitar neck.  Once you know notes on 5th and 6th string you know 1st string too.

Now I am finally taking the time to learn other chords, some 9ths etc. and triads and many things I learned in the past that I haven't gone back to yet, and working on lead guitar again. I am very happy for the internet and I love Rob's lessons!

Another useful thing is seeing how the minor pentatonic scale pattern fit together on the guitar neck...again they are only a guide and one has to use those notes creatively to make good music...I am struggling with that now. Ugh. I learned the major scale years ago but use the pentatonic much more often.  For awhile I strummed and sang and now I am going to push myself to be a better guitarist.  Cheers!

8)

Beth

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Re: C maj scale
« Reply #26 on: March 07, 2011, 05:59:36 AM »
Well I have a friend who plays beautiful guitar and writes very prolifically and records...and knows no theory at all..never played a scale...but he knows the scales...he just absorbed them from listening to music. It's interesting how different people learn and function....he always tells me he approaches music with his right brain.  I know my ability to write songs came from listening to lots of them...you absorb a lot by listening...and often I find theory just explains what you can hear..it's like you play in a certain key if you hit a bad note you will hear it!  I use scales and theory as a guide...I think a combination of both is useful but you can learn a lot of theory and not play well...If you can't feel and hear the music you won't get far. It's the same with photography you can have all the technical skills but if you don't have the artistic vision it doesn't work.

Beth

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Re: C maj scale
« Reply #27 on: March 07, 2011, 04:47:02 PM »
Play the major scale on one string and you will see for example key of C there is half step between E and F and half step between B and C.

BogHead

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Re: C maj scale
« Reply #28 on: March 08, 2011, 06:37:58 PM »
Music is played by ear and we use theory to communicate and transcribe music. Of course you can use theory to learn music but your ear have to take over otherwise you'll be in a rut. The real trick is to learn about intervals and how one note (or chord) to another note (or chord) can sound major, minor or neutral.

You'll have to experiment and don't stick to the scale notes. Modes make exceptions to the scale by changing the intervals though they're still the same notes. Play notes (chords) outside of the scale to put colors in your music.